Selection of materials for non-invasive restorations

Selection of materials for non-invasive restorations

Biography:

Division of Fixed Prosthodontics and Biomaterials University Clinic of Dental Medicine, University of Geneva
1997, Dr. med. dent. degree from the Faculty of Medicine, University of Tübingen, Germany.
2003, Assistant Professorship at the Clinic of Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Material Sciences in Zurich.
Since 2013, Head of the Division of Fixed Prosthodontics and Biomaterials at the University of Geneva.
Specialist for Prosthodontics (Swiss Society for Reconstructive Dentistry) and for Dental Implantology (WBA) of the Swiss Society for Dentistry
Member of the Board of the Swiss Leadership Team of the ITI (International Team for Implantology), Member of the Board of Directors of the EAO, an Active Member of the European Academy of Esthetic Dentistry and an Active Fellow of the Greater New York Academy of Prosthodontics.

Abstract:

Metals, Ceramics, Composites, and Hybrids: Selection of Materials for non-invasive restorations
The number of restorative materials is constantly increasing today, offering a wide range of alternatives for less invasive restorations than the traditional metal-ceramics to the restorative team. One of the reasons is the increase in esthetic demands another more recent reason is the increase in use of CAD/CAM technology. Current CAD/CAM procedures enable the fabrication of restorations out of numerous kinds of ingots of different metals, composites and ceramics. Until now, composites and ceramics have been used as standard materials for esthetic restorations. Both materials exhibit tooth-resembling optical properties, yet totally different mechanical properties. This influences their indications, and the long-term clinical behavior. Composites are less costly and easy to use, but rather weak and prone to wear and degradation over time. Therefore, composite tooth or implant crowns are predominantly used as long-term provisional. Ceramics, in contrast, are more stable but brittle materials which makes them delicate to use and prone to fracture. In order to combine the benefits of both materials and reduce the inherent risks of composites and ceramics, recently new types of hybrid esthetic material were introduced. These hybrid materials are delivered as prefabricated ingots for chair-side or centralized CAD/CAM procedures.
A trend towards an increasing application of the minimally invasive types of restorations out of these materials can be observed. The current literature and a decision tree for the selection of the various types restorations will be presented.